[F]utilitarianism

There is a school of thought to which many ethicists subscribe, whose students never seem willing to move on from the lambda-omega-lambdas, and whose parties are always unusually loud and long even after the music has been stopped for years and all the drink has dried up. This troupe of tautological idealogues loves to insist upon its own opinions and swears so should you. In doing so they both establish and undercut their point. These are the Utilitarians.

Utilitarianism is a philosophy of ethics that is summarily defined to say, “the morally right action is the action that produces …

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No Tool In The Shed Sharp Enough

It’s a curious thing, to me, witnessing atheists commenting on moral or ethic issues. Between the popular guys who appear on TV and the regular guys who may or may not appear on YouTube, the tone varies, depending on what the medium allows for or demands. But it’s not even so much the tone that keeps me watching or listening or reading. It’s the very clearly moral language they’re utilizing to disparage the audacity of Christians to allow their freely held ideas to breach the boundaries of their intellects, and, you know, to act in a way that reflects what …

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The Atheist’s Guide to Reality

Christian philosophers have been developing and refining arguments for the existence of God since the earliest times, but it’s not often one comes across a convinced atheist making a powerful philosophical case for the existence of God. Yet that’s precisely what we find—quite contrary to the author’s intent—in Alex Rosenberg’s book The Atheist’s Guide to Reality.

Check out this review of Alex Rosenberg’s book The Atheist’s Guide to Reality. Enjoy!…

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William Lane Craig, Evidentialism, & Inerrancy

William Lane Craig answers the question of whether there were guards at Christ’s tomb in an appalling (to any Bible believer) manner:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=b8UMb7NlxkU

TurretinFan’s rebuttal to Craig’s answer:

Rebuttal to Craig’s Denial of the Historicity of the Guard Account

It is disappointing, though unsurprising, to see that when one has abandoned a presuppositional commitment to the truth of Scripture, and to the God of the Bible, that one unavoidably falls further and further into the trap of editing the Gospel to make it more palatable to the ears of unbelievers.

We pray that Craig will turn from his sinful tampering …

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Unintelligent Design?

Allow me, for a moment, to explain some of my initial thoughts concerning what denial of God’s existence entails with respect to Design. If you hold that there is no God, and that there is no Design to the universe, there are a few things that follow. If there is no Designer, and if there is no Design, then there are no “designers” and there are no individual “designs.” None, at all, anywhere. I will now proceed to explain the same thing in probably too many ways and in probably too many words.

There is only cause and effect. “Intention” …

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On God’s “Evil” Actions

Probably one of the most common objections to Christianity that we hear is one that relates to the Problem of Evil. While the problem of evil asks, “How can an Omnipotent, Good God exist with evil in the world,” this particular one asks, “How can God be ‘good’ if he has done all these evil things?” Men will object to Christianity saying that God has done evil things. And from this they conclude God either doesn’t exist, or if he does exist he is not worth believing.

We answer the former problem by demonstrating from the Bible that the …

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Problems With Authority in Classical and Evidentialist Apologetics

To the extent that attempts are made in order to distinguish between the “evidentialist” and “classical” schools of apologetics, in an effort to salvage the “classical” method, these distinctions nevertheless fail to dodge the criticisms leveled at evidentialism by Van Tilian presuppositionalists. It shouldn’t strike us as very coincidental that the problem presuppositionalists have with the classical/evidentialist methods primarily concerns the presuppositions of these methods. Furthermore, that practitioners of either the classical or evidentialist methods borrow aspects from presuppositionalism (which I would argue is inevitable as long as the practitioner is at least to some extent devoted to sola scriptura

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The Bankruptcy of Skepticism and the Glory of God

Christianity is a naturally offensive truth. Not that it offends, but it exposes the offense that is part of the human condition and dares to hold humans responsible. The sinful nature of man, such as it is, detests any effort of the person who would dare to point at that nature and speak about it for what it is. The rebellious man has knowledge of his Creator because it is in the Creator’s image that he has been created. What the Creator of everything calls “truth” involves every single minute, meticulous detail of reality as we know it. Indeed it …

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